Creativity is the Art of Necessity

Scott Hyatt August 1, 2013 Comments Off on Creativity is the Art of Necessity

Creativity is the Art of Necessity

By Scott Hyatt

No one ever openly brags about stealing but when it comes to the Internet, New Yorkers are a proud bunch.

It’s fun when you can get away with borrowing a neighbor’s connection. No one is hurt and we all know those giant cable companies will find some other way to bilk us. Besides, you could argue stealing a neighbor’s Internet connection is good for the local economy. That $49 monthly fee will be put to use somewhere else.

So when I first moved into my studio apartment in Hells Kitchen, I was like every other New Yorker.

I looked for an open connection.

In a 6 floor walk-up with dozens of neighbors, there had to be an unsecured connection somewhere.

There wasn’t.

As a young boy, my Gramma used to always repeat a story she learned during the Great Depression.

“Creativity is the art of necessity.”

I didn’t know what that meant until I moved to NYC.

When you need, the force of creativity will find.

As a struggling writer, I was so poor when I first moved to NYC that I couldn’t even afford Chinese food.

But the force of creativity and necessity merged inside the Food Emporium on York and 83rd Street.

Men In Cities

I was buying four .99 Ramen noodle packs when the grocery cashier opened my eyes.

“You know if you put an egg in there it turns into Chinese food.”

“Seriously?”

“Try it next time.”

I did and for the next 6 months my routine dinner of Ramen noodles was transformed into an extravagent meal of Chinese food.

“Creativity is the art of necessity.”

I needed the Internet but I wasn’t about to pay for it.

I searched for days for an open connection, hoping something would pop up.

Then the force of creativity and necessity merged.

I knocked on my neighbor’s apartment door.

I had passed her a few times in the hallway and she was cute. She seemed friendly, even though she was a little awkward when I said hello to her and introduced myself to her in the mail room.

She answered the door in her pajamas. I tried not to look down, but I’m sure my eyes subconsciously wandered down to her ample cleavage.

“I’m wondering if you would be interested in sharing the Internet with me.” I asked.

“Sharing the Internet? Uh, I have the Internet.”

“What if we split the cost? Or maybe I can bring you over a bottle of liquor once a month to pay for my share of your Internet use. I promise not to download any large movies. I just want it for my job. I’ll pretty much just be reading newspaper articles.”

And looking at a little porn, but I refrained from admitting that.

“I guess it would be fine. But you don’t have to pay me.”

“Oh, I want to.”

“Okay, just buy me a bottle of wine and we’ll call it even every month.”

“Done.”

AllStarWine.com

And with that, I became friends with my neighbor. It’s now been 4 years and I calculated I have saved roughly $2400.

Remember that the next time you need to solve a problem.

“Creativity is the art of necessity.”

There’s a solution to everything as long as you let your creative force overtake your fears.